The MAVEN communications and outreach team has developed a variety of resources to help communicate the discoveries of the mission to a broad public audience. An article describing these resources published today in the American Geophysical Union (AGU) journal EOS (Earth and Space Science News).

Visitors to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry can check out the Invisible Mars Science on a Sphere exhibit, part of an effort by NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission team to bring Mars research to the general public. Credit: OMSI

For a cold little planet, Mars remains a hot topic: The general public wants to know more about this alien world and hear from the scientists who study it. Recent findings that highlight tantalizing clues to Mars’s wetter past have piqued this interest still further.

For example, because Mars lacks a global magnetic field, the planet has lost much of its ancient, thicker atmosphere, and much of its carbon dioxide has been lost to space. How habitable was the Red Planet, and what does its history tell us about habitability of other alien worlds?

Read the complete EOS article by Christine Shupla, , Tom Mason, and Bruce Jakosky